Curriculum

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE

English

  • English 7

In this course students work on their written and oral communication skills while strengthening their ability to understand and analyze works of literature, both classic and modern. Students read short stories, poetry, drama, novels, essays and informative articles. Students will engage in written expression of various types and purposes. Writing and speaking will focus on text-based evidence. In grammar, usage and mechanics lessons, students expand their understanding of parts of speech, phrases and clauses, sentence analysis and structure, agreement, punctuation, and other conventions.

  • English 8

In this course, students continue to build their language skills while reading classic and modern works of literature and information texts of various types. Students will practice their written and oral expression skills by analyzing a variety of issues. Writing and speaking opportunities are varied and text-based. Student will build on their skills in grammar, usage and mechanics by studying phrases and clauses, sentence analysis and structure, agreement, punctuation, and other conventions.
English 9 This course offers continued development in literature, language, and composition. Students develop an awareness of the distinctive characteristics of literary types through the study of representatives’ examples of classical and contemporary poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction that parallel their study of Modern History.

  • English 10

This course develops a response to our culture and fosters critical thinking as a means of self-expression. In the study of novels, poetry, and dramatic literature, the emphasis is on character study as it reflects the interaction of culture and environment and style. The class emphasizes increased competence in writing and speaking. Vocabulary, and grammar and usage are integral parts of this study.

  • English 11

The objectives of this course is to provide students with the tools necessary for careful literary analysis; to insist that students become critical readers and thinkers and to polish student’s writing skills through prewriting revising and editing.

  • English 12

In English 12, students will refine the writing and language skills they have acquired in their earlier years. The study of literature will involve students’ understanding the use of literal or figurative language. Excellence in expression, both written and oral, will be stressed.

  • AP Language and Composition

This is a college level course. Advanced Placement Language and Composition provides students with an opportunity to earn college credit through an intensive reading and composition course. Writing instruction consists of a broad exposure to many different writing styles with the critical reading and writing processes, including revisions, emphasized as essential learning tools. Readings are mainly non-fiction, international and diverse—including the works of thinkers in many disciplines.

  • AP English Literature and Composition

This is a college level course. Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition will engage students in a careful reading and critical analysis of fiction literature. Through the close readings of selected texts, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As students read, they will consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller scale literary elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

  • Yearbook

The course is designed to acquaint students with the skills necessary to produce a yearbook or other periodical. The students will gain in yearbook design, including layout, font usage, writing captions and headlines, editing and digital photography. All members of the class will work on a yearbook section of their choice. Students will continue working on the yearbook until its completion in late May. Students will also be responsible for advertising (selling YB), cover design/theme, and sale of business/individual advertisements. Students will learn and utilize the following programs in creation of the yearbook: Comic Life, Photoshop, and Excel.

  • Seminar

This course will help support students in the area of English and help prepare them for writing across the curriculum. More in depth studies of the subject, exposure to past tests, problem solving and test taking skills will be covered in this course.

  • Creative Writing

This course will provide students the opportunity to build and improve creative writing skills. Content includes self reflection, creative discipline and mechanical improvement while writing and exploring poetry, prose and literary non-fiction.

  • News Production

Students enrolled in News Production will be responsible for publishing regular school newspapers as well as maintaining digital "new media" platforms. Students will learn to become effective consumers of news by focusing on the concepts of journalistic ethics, sources, accuracy, news value, journalism and democracy, and freedom of the press.


Fine Arts

  • Art X

In this course you will learn basic art fundamentals, art theory and art appreciation. It is open to both beginners and advanced students.

  • Art 1

This course is an introductory studio course for students who wish to refine their artistic skills in drawing, painting, design, printmaking, and sculpture. Students will be taught advanced artistic techniques and the use of professional artist’s materials.

  • General Music

In music class you will gain an understanding of music through listening activities, performance, and the study of music history and theory. Lessons promote an appreciation and enjoyment of a wide variety of musical styles.

  • Music Appreciation

In music appreciation class you will gain an understanding of music through listening activities, performance, and the study of music history and theory.


Foreign Language

(Language course offerings are only available via APEX)

  • Spanish I

Spanish 1 provides an introduction to elementary grammar, conversational Spanish and beginning Spanish reading. The focus of the course is on vocabulary, grammatical usage, sound discrimination and everyday conversation.

  • Spanish 2

The objective of Spanish 2 is to help each student attain acceptable degree of proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. You will also review material presented in Spanish 1 are part of this course.

  • French 1

French 1 provides an introduction to elementary grammar, conversational French and beginning French reading. The focus of the course is on vocabulary, grammatical usage, sound discrimination and everyday conversation.

  • French 2

The objective of French 2 is to help each student attain acceptable degree of proficiency in listening, reading, speaking, and writing. You will also review material presented in French 1 are part of this course.


Mathematics

  • Pre-Algebra

This seventh grade course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to be successful in Algebra. A major emphasis throughout the year is the application of proportional reasoning. Students will begin to acquire an algebraic and graphical understanding of functions. They will write, solve and graph linear equations while modeling slope as a rate of change. Students also will use functions as well as symbolic reasoning to represent and connect ideas in geometry, probability and elementary statistics.

  • Algebra I

This course develops algebraic skills in problem solving and prepares you for succeeding courses in mathematics. An important aspect of this course is the learning of techniques and problem solving steps applied to more advanced problems in the future.

  • Geometry

This course includes deductive and algebraic approaches to plane, solid, and analytic geometry. Logical proof is included. Students will be required to memorize definitions, theorems, and postulates. This course prepares students for future math courses.

  • Algebra 2

This course extends the skills and concepts introduced in Algebra I. Topics of study will include quadratic, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions; sequences and series; and complex numbers, including applications that develop deeper problem solving techniques.

  • Pre Calculus

Topics for this course include further analysis of quadratic, polynomial, rational and transcendental functions including logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, matrices and trigonometry. Modeling of real world phenomena is emphasized throughout.

  • Advanced Quantitative Reasoning

AQR is a fourth-year course in mathematics, statistics and modeling for students who have completed Algebra II. The goal of the AQR course is to develop the student’s ability to investigate and solve substantial problems. Students will be asked to communicate with precision to prepare for postsecondary course work. Students will deepen and further their exploration of relations and functions.
Introduction to Engineering Introduction to Engineering provides students with a broad understanding of engineering as a profession while teaching the basic skills used in all engineering disciplines. Topics include Excel, MATLAB, 3-D visualization and technical drawing, and Computer Aided Design (CAD).


Physical Education

  • Physical Education 9 – 12

Each day you will participate in athletic activities to develop strength, flexibility, and endurance for various muscle groups; body balance, coordination and cardiovascular efficiency. The goal is to develop a life-long commitment to fitness and health.

  • Health

This course is designed to teach you health practices that improve individual and family well-being. You will examine the physical, emotional, social and psychological as well as cultural and social influences on food choices, effects of at-risk behaviors as they relate to a healthy body and study the human body. This course emphasizes physical fitness and aerobic conditioning.


Science

  • Science 7

Order and organization are the major themes for middle school science. The courses for seventh and eight grade students focus on helping students use scientific inquiry to discover patterns, trends, structures and relationships that may be described by simple principles. These principles are related to the properties or interactions within and between systems.

  • Science 8

Order and organization are the major themes for middle school science. The courses for seventh and eighth grade students focus on helping students use scientific inquiry to discover patterns, trends, structures and relationships that may be described by simple principles. These principles are related to the properties or interactions within and between systems.
Physical Science You will continue your development in the use of the processes of science, stressing the application of mathematics, data interpretation and data analysis. You will study mechanics, dynamics, heat, energy, wave motion, light, electricity, relativity and atomic physics.

  • Biology

This course introduces students to the study of life sciences. The ultimate goal is to produce students who are more scientifically literate and aware; therefore the curriculum addresses attitudes, processes, knowledge science, technology society, the environment and careers. Topics include genetics, nature of science, structure and function of the cell, chemistry of living organisms and ecological relationships. You will learn about the impact of biology on society. Each unit focuses on a science-related technological issue now confronting America and the world. You will learn the biology needed to understand the cell, genetics (including genetic engineering), heredity, ecology, molecular biology, the structures and functions of plants and animals and natural resources management.

  • Chemistry

This class teaches the composition of various substances and the changes they go through during chemical and physical reactions. The course allows students to learn how chemistry is a part of their everyday lives by way of the food they eat, their clothing, and medicines we use. It also spotlights careers and industries that utilize chemistry and provide scientific career goals. Some topics covered are oxidation-reduction reactions, atomic theory, carbon chemistry, polymers, and consumer chemistry. Laboratory experiments are used to provide a real world and hands on experience in the chemistry lab.
Environmental Science This course draws upon your previous student knowledge in the areas of physical science, biology and chemistry to analyze the process that are naturally changing their planet, the impact on humans on the global environment and their decision making in issues facing the Earth.

  • Anatomy and Physiology

Anatomy and Physiology is a biological science course that emphasizes an in-depth examination of the systems of the body with special attention given to medically related problems. It introduces basic anatomy and stresses the unique engineering design and proficiency of functions of the human body. Students who are oriented towards medical/health-allied careers and those who possess a keen interest in the structure and functioning of the human body will find the course of particular value.

  • STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics)

This course introduces students to STEM subjects and careers. Science, technology, engineering and mathematics are an important part of education in our competitive marketplace.


Social Studies

  • Ancient and Medieval World Studies

The seventh-grade year is an integrated study of world history, beginning with ancient Greece and continuing through global exploration. All four social studies strands are used to illustrate how historic events are shaped by geographic, social, cultural, economic and political factors. Students develop their understanding of how ideas and events from the past have shaped the world.

  • American History 8

This historical focus continues in the eighth grade with the study of European exploration and Colonial years prior to the creation of the United States through to the era of Reconstruction following the American Civil War. This study incorporates all four social studies strands into chronologic view of the development of the United States. Students examine how historic events are shaped by geographic, social, cultural, economic and political factors.

  • Modern History

Modern history surveys world events from the Enlightenment to the present. Though the major focus is on Western Civilization significant attention is given to African and Asian history in order to address a diverse and global nation. You will learn about the rise of modern nations (1500 - 2000), technical and commercial revolutions, colonialism, world conflicts, the rise and fall of totalitarianism, twentieth century nationalism in Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and the inhumanity of slavery, the Holocaust and apartheid. The course will help you understand the role of the United States in the world and your role as a citizen of the global village.

  • American History

The American history course is a survey of the nation’s economic, political, cultural, and diplomatic development from 1877 to the present. Geographic themes and economic decisions that affected U. S. history are an integral part of the course. Topics include the significance of democracy, civil liberties, the Constitution, changes in the status and achievements of African-Americans and other cultures, and the problems and decisions that influenced the past and the present. Students learn to apply lessons in history to their own experiences. The American history course is a survey of the nation’s economic, political, cultural, and diplomatic development from 1877 to the present.

  • American Government

This course helps you understand the governmental process and the institutions that affect your responsibilities as a U. S. citizen. You are expected to participate in discussion of citizenship and multicultural issues. You will learn how the structure and processes of government affect your everyday life.

  • Economics

You will learn how the economy as a whole functions and how it is measured, along with the processes needed to make good economic decisions. This includes the relationship of supply and demand, how firms organize and compete through pricing of goods and services, money and banking, business cycles, the role of government, international trade and different economic systems.
Time to Speak in this course each student will learn and understand effective communication skills and how to prepare and deliver various types of public speeches.

  • Geography

You will study geography from the physical, political and cultural prospective through the five basic geographical themes of location, place, human environment interaction, movement and region.
Psychology This course introduces the basic concepts of psychology. Students will explore the application of ideas in psychology to help them better understand themselves and to identify ways to improve their ability to interact with others. The lessons will emphasize behavior, the mental process, intelligence, theories, disorders and treatment methods.

  • AP Psychology

Advanced Placement Psychology is a college-level course, which introduces students to the discipline of psychology by emphasizing the history of psychology as a science, the different theoretical approaches that underlie explanations of behavior, and the contemporary research methods used by psychologists. Students will learn about the many different fields within psychology and about the importance of ethics in both scientific research and the practice of psychology. Students will come to understand the relationship between biology and behavior. A wide range of psychological topics will be examined such as: sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, cognition, motivation, emotion, personality, testing and individual differences, and abnormal psychology. The final section of the course will consider the impact of social factors on behavior. Throughout the course students will be exposed to classic psychological studies. The AP exam is a requirement of the course.

  • AP Human Geography

Human Geography AP is an introduction to geographic perspectives on human society. Human interactions and their settings are studied through spatial, human environment, and regional traditions. Implications of such study at local, national, and international levels are drawn. The course strives to analyze such concepts as population, land usage, urban development, cultural distribution, and human organization through spatial relations. The AP exam is a requirement of the course.


Occupational Experience

  • Ed Opt 10 – Jobs for Cincinnati Graduates

This an exposure course for 10th grade students. By identifying the youth’s skills and interests, JCG assists in creating an achievable career plan and aides in career exploration. JCG also connects students to social services to overcome challenges, as well as introduces students to the importance of volunteerism in the community.

  • Ed Opt 12 - Jobs for Cincinnati Graduates

JCG teaches important life and career skills, as well as preparation for state graduation tests. By identifying the youth’s skills and interests, JCG assists in creating an achievable career plan and aides in career exploration. JCG also connects students to social services to overcome challenges, as well as introduces students to the importance of volunteerism in the community.

  • Work Study

Students in the work-study program learn the work ethic needed to become productive responsible individuals through paid work experiences. Students have the opportunity to strengthen the connection between school and work and to develop positive attitudes required for success. Work experience is the bridge between the classroom and the world of work. This course is only open to students that have an active IEP.